Category Archives: Pubs

The Plough, Shepreth

The Plough is a pub in the South Cambridgeshire village of Shepreth, less than ten miles from Cambridge.

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Queen Edith, Cambridge

The Queen Edith, the first new build pub in Cambridge in over 30 years, opened on Wulfstan Way on 24th April.

Queen Edith

This is the third pub in the city run by Milton Brewery, following their reopening of the Devonshire Arms in 2010, and the Haymakers in 2013. We visited on the opening weekend and there were five Milton beers on handpump, alongside three or four guests including B&T Edwin Taylor’s Extra Stout and Star Brewing Meteor. As with the other Milton pubs in the city, the excellent Moravka lager, brewed in the Peak District, is on keg. Likewise, the interior furnishings will be familiar to anybody who has set foot in their other pubs, especially in the snug bar with its dark wood, high-backed seats. The lounge is a larger, lighter room and features the main bar. We enjoyed a couple of pints of Milton’s Justinian in the snug and a good vegetarian nut loaf Sunday roast.

Queen Edith

The Queen Edith is built on what was the car park of the previous pub of that name that opened in December 1961, around the time the nearby Addenbrookes Hospital began admitting patients on its new site. Originally a Lacon house, the first licensees were Mr & Mrs Coop.

It closed 50 years later in December 2011; the last to run the pub was Paul St John-Campbell, who was there for over two years before he was made redundant. In any case, the previous year owners Punch Taverns had applied to have the pub demolished and replaced by 8 houses, arguing the pub was unviable. These plans were rejected but the pub was sold, and in the hands of developers Danescroft new plans were approved that allowed the pub to be demolished last year and the new pub built, alongside a block of 12 flats. It’s a nice building, the first new build pub in the city since the Ancient Druids in 1984 (closed in 1996 and now a Chinese restaurant) with a large catchment area and few other pubs nearby. Tantalisingly, Milton brewery said they see this as a potential template for the development of other redundant pub sites.

Salisbury Arms and St. Radegund Reopen

I don’t know, you wait ages for a refurbished pub and then three reopen at once. Following the Grain Store opening at the beginning of March, the St. Radegund and Salisbury Arms also reopened in Cambridge this month.

Salisbury Arms

76 Tenison Road |

Salisbury Arms

A Charles Wells pub that appears to have recovered from its recent identity crisis. Once full of memorabilia, including 1970s Cambridge Beer Festival posters, dummies sat at a table on the balcony overlooking the main bar, and sacks of grain and a cyclist suspended from the ceiling, less than a year ago it had a makeover which removed all items of interest, repainted the interior bright white and left it characterless.

Salisbury Arms

However, this succesive refurbishment has redressed some of that, bringing back the Beer Fest posters, more bicycles, even the pub game Ring the Bull, rescued and returned to its rightful place on the wall (don’t try and compete with anybody who works there – they’re well practiced).

Salisbury Arms

The interior layout has been altered, most notably a distressed wood, metal-topped bar on the extended ground floor level, and the addition of a pizza oven on the lower level (ensuring a few more choices for vegetarians, to add to the Ciambotta and Mac & Cheese).

Salisbury Arms

There were 4 real ales and 8 keg lines on the new bar, including Young’s London Stout and the first appearance in the city of Charlie Wells Dry Hopped Lager – although I’d say more hops have been used in decorating the interior of the pub than in brewing that particular beer.

Salisbury Arms

The Salisbury is perhaps best known as having been one of the CAMRA Investments pubs in the 1970s, at the time boasting “possibly the largest selection in the country of bottle-conditioned English and Belgian beers”.

Salisbury advert 1970s

I lived just along the street in the early 90s when it was a bustling pub, packed with students in the evening, with loud music from the jukebox (since removed) and at least eight hand pumps, with beers including the since discontinued Mansfield Riding Mild.

Salisbury Arms Salisbury Arms

Although the interior is much altered from the one I fondly remember, the latest refurb has nevertheless made it a welcoming place again, the main bar large and airy, the small back room still almost like a snug (who knew books didn’t only appear on wallpaper), and it’s back on the map for a Cambridge pub crawl.

St. Radegund

129 King Street

Radegund Free House

Even with a new layout, this is probably still the smallest pub in Cambridge if not the county. The renovation has certainly let in more light, with the raised ceiling uncovering the tops of the windows, although this has involved the removal of the names burned into the ceiling by some of the regulars. Much of the memorabilia has been retained, including pictures of Dame Vera Lynn (the Vera Lynn Appreciation Society was formerly held on Friday evenings), framed articles about the King Street Run, and a photo of the Garrick pub which once stood here on the corner at Four Lamps. A TV screen above the bar was showing the rugby, which everyone else in the bar was watching.

St Radegund

I’m not sure if the relocation of the bar has really gained much floor space or any extra seating, but it has uncovered a fireplace, although it’s not clear if this will actually be used (it was cold enough on the day that a fire would have been welcome).


There are 8 pumps installed on the bar, although on the opening day only two were on – Saffron Brewery Royal Blue and Yakima Gold from the ever dependable Crouch Vale, with keg Brooklyn Lager, Budvar and Kozel – although no sign of the Milton Sackcloth which used to be a regular ale brewed exclusively for the Radegund. It’s still a work in progress though.

Tivoli in ruins

Sadly, on the day two Cambridge pubs reopened, another was burning down – the Tivoli, a Wetherspoon on Chesterton Road. It caught fire in the early hours of the morning and burnt for hours despite its riverside location, with water being pumped from the Cam to fight the fire. As I was nearby I had a look, and was told by a fireman that the roof had collapsed and that the fire and water had caused structural damage that has left the building in a perilous state. It will be a shame if Cambridge loses not just another pub, but a fine old building, formerly the Tivoli Cinema (Tivoli blog post).

The Tivoli

Sea Palling Pubs

Sea Palling is a small village on the east coast of Norfolk. We were sad to find that the Old Hall Inn had closed since our last visit earlier this year, although we enjoyed good food and drink in Reefs Bar, the one remaining pub in the village.

Old Hall Inn

Old Hall Inn

The building is described as both “originally three separate dwellings, dating from the 16th century” and “dating back to the middle of the 17th century… formerly a farmhouse”. It only became a pub relatively recently, in the late 1960s, although the wood beamed interior still gave it the feel of an old drinking haunt, and it apparently had the requisite ghosts – the “figure of a woman in grey clothing”, “the sweet, sickly smell of strong tobacco”, and a resident poltergeist.

Old Hall

It closed in March this year and in May the large eight bedroom establishment was sold at auction for a mere £160,000 and is currently being converted back into a residential dwelling – the low price probably reflects the scale of work needed, with replacing the roof already in progress.

There is still a pub in Sea Palling, Reefs Bar, next to the slipway, the dunes standing in the way of sea views, but very close to the encroaching North Sea.

Reefs Bar


Reefs is a 1950s built pub that sits just this side of the dunes as you approach the beach. It’s been busy each time we’ve visted, and the Wolf Ale, presumably the regular real ale, has always been in top nick. On this occasion we also had a decent vegetarian lasagne and chips to accompany it, before taking our beers to the outdoor benches to soak up the sea air.

There have been at least three pubs in this area of the village. Faden’s Map of 1797 shows the Ship, a pub situated very close to the shore – it’s possible it was claimed by the sand and sea, much like the former Church of St Mary’s at nearby Eccles-on-Sea.

ReefsThe Lifeboat Inn, situated further inland down beach road, was recorded by at least 1858 but was destroyed by the 1953 floods. It was rebuilt as a single storey building where it stands today, then a Lacons pub named the lifeboat Tavern, becoming ‘Reefs’ in 2004 when the current landlord took over – it is named after the reefs that have been placed just offshore as part of the coast defenses. According to Norfolk Pubs, it gained a full licence when the license was removed from the nearby Cock Inn in 1959.

Cock Inn

The Cock Inn was a large building that stood further inland on the corner of Beach Road and The Street from at least 1794 (Norfolk Pubs). It closed in the late 1950s and was demolished. The last publican there may have been Walter George Austrin, a boat builder who in 1963 is recorded as “formerly at the Old Cock Inn”, he also operated a Tea Stall on the beach at Sea Palling.

You can still get beer and hot drinks in Sea Palling, though the tides seem perilously close to calling time.

Green, Andrew – Ghosts of today (1980)
Pearse, Bowen – The Ghost-Hunter’s Casebook: The Investigations of Andrew Green Revisited (2011)
Norfolk Pubs
Reefs Bar

Ales in the Dales

Beers along the Tour de France Stage 1 route.

Black Swan

We recently took a last minute break and ended up staying for a week in a cottage in Aysgarth in the Yorkshire Dales. Unbeknown to us, the cottage overlooked the roads that will be part of the Tour de France route as it passes from Leeds to Harrogate on Saturday 5th July. So we noted the best pubs and beers we came across along or nearby the route, which was well decorated with yellow bikes and bunting in anticipation of the event.

Beer Bike

Of all the pubs we visited, one in particular left a lasting impression:

Victoria Arms, Worton, Wensleydale

We passed the Victoria Arms several times before we eventually stopped for a beer. It looked like it might be an unspoilt pub – an old Magnet Ales sign hangs outside – but we had no idea we were walking into “something of a legend” where time seems to have stood still for decades. Ralph Daykin, who died in September 2013, ran the pub for 57 years and it is now in the hands of his son Neil who has been there all his life. “Dog’s had me trainers” he said as he picked one of the pair up from the middle of his living room where Hendrix the spaniel had dropped it, at the corner of which is the bar. A newspaper and some letters lay open on one of the tables, clothes were strewn across the settle, the carpet probably hadn’t seen a hoover since before the age of Dysons.

Victoria Arms

Theakstons Best and Black Sheep Bitter were on draught, “What’s your favourite?” Louise asked. He considered it for a few seconds as he looked at the pumps. “Theakstons s’alright” he said unenthusiastically as he began pouring. The walls are covered in all manner of curios, including the rear end of a stuffed fox. The larger adjoining room has a pool table and more curios, including a jukebox and eighties game machine, neither of which looked like they were in use. In the front room, he warmed to us slightly as we talked to him about the Tour de France. “It won’t make much difference to me unless people camp nearby” he reasoned. His elderly mother nevertheless suggested he should get some crisps in.

Victoria Arms WortonMore than any other pub I’ve visited, this one left me with the feeling that I’d had a glimse into the past, when a farmer might serve beer from his front room for extra income – Bulmer’s Directory of 1890 records a “victualler and farmer” here and at the George & Dragon, Aysgarth. A photo on the wall shows Ralph Daykin, also a farmer, sitting on a chair looking caringly at a lamb stretched out thawing in front of the open fire.

Here’s a round up of the other pubs and beers we particularly enjoyed.



Campbells is a good place to stock up on bottled beer on the way in and out of the Yorkshire Dales (11 miles from leaving the A1 at Catterick), with a range of beers from Yorkshire Breweries.


Home to the Black Sheep Brewery and Theakstons. Both have visitor centres where we picked up bottles we hadn’t tried before – Black Sheep Imperial Russian Stout, and Theakstons Distiller’s Cask, presumably aged in whisky casks, although the label only says it has been “warmly acquainted with Speyside Whisky”.


East Witton

Cover Bridge Inn – situated on its own on the banks of the River Ure, with the date 1674 above the entrance to the gents, we were pleasantly surprised by the beer range – as well as the ubiquitous Theakston’s Best and Old Peculiar, there was By The Horns Stiff Upper Lip, Thornbridge Jaipur and Ilkley Mary Jane, enjoyed in the beer garden alongside the river.

West Witton

Fox & Hounds:

Tour de YorkshireFreehouse with a good range of well kept guest beers, best when visited the Yorkshire Dales Tour de Yorkshire, a Citra hopped beer brewed specially for the event.


Aysgarth Falls Hotel – Enjoyed good beer and food here and returned for more later in the week. The Salamander Mudpuppy was excellent, best of the beers we tried there, and their beers are on often.

George and Dragon – Had a great meal here, the ‘George and Dragon’ ale brewed for them by Yorkshire Dales Brewing Co the best of the beers.


The George:


A stone-built inn dating from 1732, it’s actually in Bishopdale, but just a couple of miles from Aysgarth. One of the best pubs we visited, great atmosphere, friendly welcome, good food and beer, including Yorkshire Dales Howgate and Northallerton Gun Dog Bitter.




Prior to the TdF, it seems the most celebrated event in this village near Aysgarth was James Herriot taking his honeymoon at the Wheatsheaf in 1941. Had a refreshing pint of Black Sheep Velo, a special TdF beer apparently brewed with coriander and orange, although the latter ingredient was barely detectable.


Home to the Yorkshire Dales Brewing Co, one of the best discoveries we made during our trip, a local brewery producing consistently good beers wherever we came across them. The brewery is located in a barn just behind the main street.

Kings Arms:

Kings Arms

Doubled as the Drovers Arms for the TV series All Creatures Great and Small, walls covered in photos from the filming, stone-flagged floors and high ceilings, another pub serving a house beer brewed by Yorkshire Dales Brewery.

White Rose:

White Rose

We came here just to try the Yorkshire Dales Askrigg Ale and ended up staying for a decent meal.

There is a third pub in Askrigg, the Crown Inn, which we didn’t have time to visit but was recommended by the head brewer of Yorkshire Dales brewery as another place serving his beers.


George & Dragon – We initially passed through this pub just to gain access to the Hawdraw Force waterfall, the highest single drop waterfall in England, but were so impressed by the cosy, traditional interior of the pub that we returned for an evening meal. The meal was accompanied by a couple of locals playing acoustic guitar and the crackling of a log fire. The friendliness of the landlord made up for the less-than-warm welcome from his wife.



Farmers Arms:

Farmers Arms

Lovely pub in Upper Swaledale, very friendly, great views from the tables at the front and a cracking pint of Yorkshire Dales Brewery’s Butter Tubs (named after the fiercely steep, windy road that cyclists will have to tackle on the Tour). They’re holding a King of the Mountains festival during the TdF weekend. The holiday apartment they also own, directly opposite the pub, was noted for a future visit.

Tan Hill

Tan Hill Inn:

Tan HillOn the edge of Swaledale, well known as the highest pub in Great Britain at 1,732ft above sea level. After taking in the view over a pint of Black Sheep bitter, we picked up some bottles of it’s own Tan Hill Inn Ewe Juice, a beer brewed for it by the Dent Brewery.


Further afield, and not on the TdF route, but well worth a visit for two cracking pubs.

Sun Inn:

Sun Inn

Faced with a choice of two unfamiliar beers, a local at the bar suggested we try the Kirkby Lonsdale Tiffin Gold – “everybody in here’s been drinking it all day” he said. It proved to be one of the best beers we tried during the trip and we wished we didn’t have to drive to our next destination so we could have sessioned on it too.

George & Dragon:

The Dent Brewery Tap, with a range of their own cask beers, and on keg Samuel Smiths Extra stout, Organic Lager, Taddy Lager and Sovereign Bitter.

Dent Tap

Tour de France beers:

Ilkley Marie JauneWe came across several special TdF beers on cask from local breweries including Wensleydale Top Cogg, Northallerton Peloton Pale, Yorkshire Dales Tour de Dales and KOM Festivale (available at the Farmers Arms KOM festival), and Richmond Sacre Bleu, as well as bottles of Ilkley Marie Jaune, a variation on their Mary Jane, brewed with French hops and yeast, picking up the last bottle of it on the shelf from the Wine Shop in Grassington.

North West Yorkshire CAMRA guide

Cambridge Pubs showing the World Cup

Well it’s nearly that time, when we can share hopes and inevitable disappointments, watching England’s World Cup matches in a pub. I watched some of the 2002 World Cup in what was my local at the time, the Hat & Feathers on Barton Road in Cambridge, when such was the time difference between here and South Korea and Japan, some matches were shown in pubs as early as seven o’clock in the morning – so begins a good day! When Beckham scored the penalty against Argentina, the pub erupted in celebration. Three matches later we were beaten in the quarter finals by this year’s hosts Brazil.

The Hat & Feathers has since closed and been converted to flats, so here’s a current list of good pubs that have confirmed they’re showing the World Cup:

Alma CB2 1HW
Blue Moon CB1 2LF
Cambridge Brew House CB1 1LH
Carpenters Arms CB4 3DZ
Champion of the Thames CB1 1LN
Dobblers CB1 2QF
Great Northern CB1 2JB
Kingston Arms (England games only) CB1 2NU
Mill CB2 1RX
Six Bells CB1 2HS

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Cambridge Pubs

Cambridge has plenty of good pubs, and after living here for over twenty years, I thought it was time I wrote a guide to them. Follow this link for a full round up of the best Cambridge pubs

For starters, here are four of my favourites:

Elm Tree

16A Orchard St, Cambridge CB1 1JT
Elm Tree
Friendly, relaxing pub with several real ales and a fridge full of Belgian beers including rarities, accompanied by detailed tasting menus. Outdoor seating along the alley at the side that becomes a sun trap in the summer. Live music several times a month. No food but the Free Press is just along the street – yes, two of the best pubs in Cambridge are just 50 metres apart…

Free Press

7 Prospect Row CB1 1DU Map | @FreePressPub
Free PressA wonderful little traditional backstreet pub, one of my favourite pubs anywhere, a must-visit Cambridge pub. Dating back to at least 1825, it was nearly lost forever to 1970s redevelopments, boarded up and awaiting its fate. Luckily, it was saved from the wrecking ball, refitted and renovated, and lives on. Two open fires in the winter, beer festivals in the beer garden in the summer, great food, draught beers are from Greene King and guests, and generally amongst the best kept beers in Cambridge.


14, Mill Lane, Cambridge CB2 1RX | @TheMillCam
Mill, Cambridge
Excellent pub in enviable riverside location, with Laundress Green serving as its unofficial beer garden, a perfect refreshment stop when punting. Great selection of cask, keg and bottled beer, very supportive of local breweries, good food – this pub has been doing everything right since it was refurbished and reopened under new management in 2012.

Pint Shop

10 Peas Hill CB2 3PN Map | @PintShop
Pint Shop
Opened in November 2013 in a handsome 1830s merchant’s house just off the Market Place in the city centre, it proved to be an instant hit. Impressive beer selection with 10 keg and 6 cask lines serving the finest beers from the likes of Buxton, Kernel, Magic Rock, Marble, Rogue and Southern Tier. Bar snacks available but separate dining areas keep the main bar and snug beer focused. An essential stop on any Cambridge pub tour.

Continue reading the full Cambridge Pub Guide with map